Queensland House Designs, 1940 to 1959

Continuing the collection of Queensland House Design catalogues, this page includes documents from 1940 through to 1959.

 

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I do not own the copyright to these publications. Most of the documents have been sourced from on-line repositories and are freely available in the public domain. They are published here solely to benefit local historical research and promote the conservation of our shared built heritage.

Approved Designs, State Advances Corporation, 1945

The post-war era was characterized by austerity and a drive for cheap housing to cater for a growing population. These designs are often referred to as "Housing Commission" homes, although they were financed by its predecessor, the State Advances Corporation. The plans comprise conventional style weatherboard houses which can be seen all over Australia, and hybrid forms.

This document was digitised by the State Library of Queensland and is available here.

The Queensland Housing Commission, 194X

The State Advances Corporation was wound up in 1945 and replaced by the Queensland Housing Commission. The1950s saw a shortage of housing and the Commission was given a wide brief to plan, finance, construct and lease dwellings to the public. This catalogue is dominated by conventional designs, many still high-set, with two or more street-facing waterfall hips.This document was digitised by the State Library of Queensland and is available here.

The Queensland Housing Commission, 1950

Another publication by the Housing Commission, dated 1950. This document was digitised by the State Library of Queensland and is available here.

The Queensland Housing Commission, 1959

And lastly, a Housing Commission publication from 1959. A few designs of the conventional style are still present but we now see a range of new concepts enabled by novel building materials. Our post-war suburbs still abound in these houses but they have no level of protection and are easily demolished and replaced.

This document was digitised by the State Library of Queensland and is available here.